Tag Archives: Tips

Policy Awareness: Your Smartest Choice

Contributed by Director of Strategic Planning & Development, Kathy Olek Donatelli

A clear and concise social media policy seems pretty sensible for every business. But how many of you can lay your hands on one? If so, do you know what it says?  What about a corporate ethics policy?  A communication policy?

As the lines between “personal and professional” as well as “home and office” continue to blur, many companies are revamping their corporate guidelines across the board to reflect today’s electronically active and collaborative workforce. Yet another reason for this recent focus is mobile access and the ability to work from home. As employees are increasingly using their own mobile devices at work, as well as working from home and in the field, companies need to find a way to guide and focus communications activities. And although words like policy, compliance, and guidelines may sound limiting and daunting to some, many of these documents exist to protect both the employee and the company alike. More than anything else, policies help to set expectations and provide examples of what is and what is not acceptable. They are your first point of reference if there is ever any question about your actions.

millennials-in-charge-640x302Photo credit: Insperity

And if the entire electronic communication conundrum is not difficult enough, now we have an entirely new generation of tech savvy multi-taskers. Enter stage right the Millennials, making up the majority of our workforce now and into the future. They were born with a smart phone in their hand and as a generation, they move fast, they love change and they are ready for any pop-up or crowd sourced opportunity. Now more than ever, corporate policies need to be in place to manage expectations and set standards among the greenest employees in the workforce.

Most formal policies address issues that may be perceived as unlawful and/or unethical, as well as those that undermine company, brand, employee, shareholder, vendor or and customer trust. Issues typically addressed in these policies include:

  • Conflicts of Interest or Opinion
  • Protection of Company Assets and Resources
  • Criminal Conduct
  • Protection of Confidential and Proprietary Information
  • Intellectual Property
  • Interaction with the Media and other Public Parties
  • Compliance and Disciplinary Actions

The bottom line? Questions about social media, corporate ethics and communications policies should find their way into the interview process if you are just beginning with a new company.  And if you are already working, a current copy of company policy is most likely available in the human resources department. These policies may not address (or provide final answers to) every possible issue or situation. General questions or issues you have about your company’s policies should be directed to your manager or Human Resources Department.

policiesPhoto credit: dreamstime.com

Don’t be surprised if, as a requirement for continued employment, you will be required to resign and re-certify every two years, in writing, your statement of compliance with corporate policies. And make sure you fully understand the stated violations, disciplinary implications and resulting consequences so that your actions don’t come back to bite you in the butt. The bottom line? Be proactive and do your homework.

Technology Can Lower Job Stress

I recently stumbled across an article regarding stressful jobs and I had some pretty specific thoughts about it. So I looked to technology and created this blog post!

usa today stress jobs

USA Today posted Forbes’ list of the most stressful careers. Many of these careers involve elements of danger, or they feature long or irregular hours. Here’s what they came up with:

• Police or detective                                                             • Military service member

• Firefighter                                                                              • Pilot

• Event coordinator                                                              • Senior corporate executive

• Public relations executive                                              • Newspaper reporter

While I’m of the belief that much of the stress people complain about at work is self-induced, I’m also of the belief that certain positions will always and forever be stressful. In my opinion active military, law enforcement and fire fighters, emergency room doctors and most other personnel in the ER, members of the bomb squad, skyscraper window washers and bridge painters (Imagine being up that high!), school teachers and day care workers – that’s stress!

But an event planner?

Stress - business person stressed at office. Business woman holdPhoto credit:  Arianna Huffington’s Tips for Managing Stress – Not Just for Event Planners!

Now, let me just say that I have friends who are event planners. I also have been involved in the planning of many events – business and personal. Yes, there is stress involved. No, it should not be on a list of most stressful jobs.

Let me explain.

Start to finish there are steps that need to be taken to pull off a successful event. These steps can be as simple or complex as you make them. Let’s talk about a few, and let’s keep focus on business events. Think speaker series, seminars, and networking mixers.

Location: You know what “they” say… Location, location, location!
Theme: This includes decorations, entertainment, speakers and / or panel, and even the food and beverage menu.
Menu: There are so many options now that Pittsburgh has become a “foodie” city! Sit down dinner, buffet, waiter-passed appetizers? A lot of this depends on theme and budget.
Guest list: Who is invited and…
• Promotion: How will you get them there, and keep track of who’s who?
Follow up: How do you keep people coming to your events? How do you continue to entice new attendees to show up?

Every single bullet point has a technology component to it. Every. Single. One.

Location:  You’re going to use Google to find cool places to host this event right? You’ll be in business if you can take a virtual tour of venues.
Theme: One word: Pinterest
Menu: If a restaurant or caterer doesn’t have a website… well, you know.
Guest list: You better have the contact information of every single company who you consider your audience and competition;  and your current and potential clients. And you need to have it organized.
• Promotion: Online registration is key. Capture all the information when they register and use it for… you guessed it… follow up!
Follow up: Send out a “Thank You” for attending email with a simple survey asking what they liked – and didn’t like – about your event. Start to finish. From the way you initially contacted them to invite them, to the venue, theme, food, others in attendance, and most importantly – what they would do to make the next event better. Then LISTEN to them. Or if all else fails, just use this app to gauge your audience’s facial expressions.

technology-and-eventsPhoto credit: StartYourBusinessMag.com

Sure, there are software packages out there that you can buy. Open the box and start plugging away. But if you’re a perfectionist like me, you’ll work much better with something personalized. A system that has all the bells and whistles that suit you, your company, and your goals. Guess what?

We have the people who can actually plan events for you, or create software – and even an app – for that.

Seriously? Yes, seriously. Give me a call or shoot me an email (Here’s where that crazy technology comes in handy, again!) and I’ll explain. Don’t be a statistic, be an event planning rock star and let technology (and 4C) help!

Change the Way You Look at Change

This post is part of a series on how the 9 Laws of Data Mining from Tom Khabaza can be applied to analytics. You can find previous posts here.

Law #9: “Law of Change”: All patterns are subject to change

change

Photo credit: Tedrafranklin, Shutterstock. CC0 Public Domain

All patterns change — not only because the data changes, but because our understanding of the business domain changes.  As Wayne Dyer said, “If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” (emphasis mine)

For example, when we devise a better marketing campaign after completing a strategic plan to increase customers, we may change the customer profile so that the next time that we run the customer segmentation we may get a different result and those results may trigger other marketing changes. Even when the customer profile does not change, our understanding of competitive offers, substitute products, and other market factors can cause us to change how we decide to implement the business process.  Even when the data pattern is similar, we may have new information about the business or the economy as a whole that will affect how we understand the business and this will affect our evaluation of the model.

The job of a data miner and an analyst is never done—there is always something else to study and a new nugget of truth to learn about a market.  However, we can sometimes fall into the trap of doing things because they have always been done that way. So, how do we get ourselves out of a “rut” in analytics?  How do you repeat a process over and over again while still asking yourself about what could or should change?  The answer lies in having a “cheat sheet” of questions that forces you to think about the analysis in a different way, in other words to change the way you look at the problem. . . or in this case, to change the way we look at change.

This time of year is a great time to think about change, so while we are on the subject of “change”, let’s ask ourselves: How do we measure change? Is there a checklist of things that we should investigate when studying change?  Below are six ways to think about measuring change.

1. How Much?

The obvious and first question that we typically ask is the “how much” question.  In other words, what was the amount of change, the raw total difference from one time period to another?  But don’t stop there!  There is so much more that you can learn about change by asking more questions.

2. Rate of Change: To What Extent? What Percent?

How about calculating the percent change from one time period to another?  This helps us to understand when the change happened and what the extent of the change was. You could also analyze the rate of change over different time periods and ask yourself whether there is a pattern in the rates of change.  If you vary the time period that you are studying, you might get different patterns, like the difference between the average change over months versus quarters versus year over year.

3. What is the Average Change for Multiple Change Rates?

If you have lots of data, you could look at the average change over different time periods and then compare the change rates for one period compared to the difference from the mean or median value.

4. What is the Difference from Optimal?

In some cases, the difference from an average won’t mean much, but the difference from an optimal number or the top performer in a category will give you a lot more insight.  Creating an index is helpful in this case because it makes it easy to see how the current value differs from the optimal or desired amount.

5. Related questions: Where? Causation? Multiple Changes?

Once you have measured change, you can ask other questions that are related to the change, like “Where did the change happen?” or “Who or what factors caused the change?” or “Did multiple changes happen at the same time?”

6. Meta questions: The Nature of the Change

Don’t forget to ask meta questions like: What was the nature of the change? Is it beneficial or detrimental? Was the change an anomaly, an outlier, or part of a larger pattern of change?  And finally, you can ask: How long do you expect or predict the current trend to continue?

We all know that change is inevitable, but how we analyze and learn from change is not.  Understanding the relevance of the changing patterns, what the change means for our business, is how we translate information into insight.  Insight helps us develop a strategy and then we can focus on executing the plan with specific tactics.  However, everything starts with the decision to analyze the change and to look at change in a new way.

 

Tips to Increase your SEO

4CBlog_seoTips_IMG

One of the key factors we often look at when building or rebuilding a website is Search Engine Optimization. The term “Search Engine Optimization” is well known as “SEO” and has been a hot topic for the past several years. Ever since Google was just a twinkle in some tech-guys eye, back in the late ’90s.

SEO is one heckova buzzword that gets used extremely often. In many cases the demand from a company is “We want to be on the first page of results when we search” or “If we aren’t number 1, then why do we have a website?” – some may find this odd, but increasing SEO is no easy task. There are a number of activities that can be done to help increase your company searchability.

Continue reading Tips to Increase your SEO

Take the “Work” Out of Networking

Contributed by Business Development Manager, Joe Gastony

Sometimes, it’s not what you know it’s WHO you know. These words have never been truer than for those in business development and sales positions. And this is why I network. I want to discuss the importance of networking in a day and age where we are all glued to our smartphones, and social networks have taken the human contact out of daily life. Sure LinkedIn, emails and blog posts are important – but if you are trying to grow your book of business, and increase industry knowledge, networking is crucial.

fear

For many people, networking can be challenging… even frightening. But fear not because networking events are all about people meeting new people and trying to find ways to HELP one another. With this in mind networking is way less intimidating!

Here are the top 4 reasons why I network:

Build CONFIDENCE! Pushing yourself to talk to people you don’t know increases confidence.

Build FRIENDSHIPS! People like to do business with people they like. Go ahead make some friends at your next networking event.

Increase OPPORTUNITIES! All sales people know the key to a successful business is a large sales funnel. Networking is a great way to increase sales opportunities. Also the more people who know about you and what you do, the more likely they are to refer you to others.

Increase KNOWLEDGE! Sometimes it is not WHO you know it’s WHAT you know. I recommend industry specific networking if you can. People in specific industries respect others that care and are knowledgeable about their industry. Increase your knowledge and you increase your credibility.

networking

Think about these tips the next time you find yourself entering a room where you don’t know anyone… and leave with some new connections, and maybe even some new friends.